VS2017 and NuGet for C++/CLI

At the time of writing it still isn’t possible to use the NuGet package manager for C++/CLI projects. My workaround is to:

  1. Add a new C# class library project to the solution.
  2. Add any NuGet packages to this new project.
  3. Configure the C# project so it always builds in Release configuration.
  4. Use the Build Dependencies dialog to ensure that the new C# project is built before the C++/CLI project.
  5. Add to the C++/CLI project a reference to the NuGet packages by using the output folder of the C# project.

Example

Create a new solution with a C++/CLI class library…

Add a C# class library (.Net Framework), delete Class1.cs, then go to the solution’s NuGet package manager:

2018-09-05 12_19_13-.png

Install the Newtonsoft.Json package for the C# project:2018-09-05 12_29_01-Solution3 - Microsoft Visual Studio.png

Change the C# build configuration so that the Release configuration builds for both Debug and Release:2018-09-05 12_31_24-Configuration Manager.png

Then delete the unused Debug configuration:2018-09-05 12_31_42-Configuration Manager.png

2018-09-05 12_32_14-Configuration Manager.png

Make C++/CLI project dependent on the C# project:2018-09-05 12_34_09-Solution3 - Microsoft Visual Studio.png

(Note: I use the above for this dependency rather than adding a reference to the project to avoid copying the unused C# project to the C++/CLI’s output folders.)

Build the solution.

Add a reference to the Newtonsoft library by using the Browse option in the Add References dialog and locating the C# project’s bin/Release folder:

2018-09-05 12_38_57-Select the files to reference....png

Build the solution again. The Newtonsoft library will now be copied to the C++/CLI build folder:

2018-09-05 12_40_59-Debug.png

First test: add some code to the C++/CLI class to demonstrate basic JSON serialisation:

#pragma once

using namespace System;

namespace CppCliDemo {

	using namespace Newtonsoft::Json;

	public ref class Class1
	{
	private:

		String^ test = "I am the walrus";

	public:

		property String^ Test
		{
			String^ get() { return this->test; }
			void set(String^ value) { this->test = value; }
		}

		String^ SerialiseToJson()
		{
			auto json = JsonConvert::SerializeObject(this, Formatting::Indented);
			return json;
		}
	};
}

Then add a simple C# console app, reference just the C++/CLI project, and test the class:2018-09-05 12_50_22-Reference Manager - CSharpConsoleTest.png

static void Main(string[] args)
{
var test = new CppCliDemo.Class1();
var json = test.SerialiseToJson();
Console.Write(json);
}

 

The output – nicely formatted JSON 🙂

2018-09-05 12_51_48-C__Users_Jon_Source_Repos_Solution3_CSharpConsoleTest_bin_Debug_CSharpConsoleTes.png

Second test, make sure a clean rebuild works as expected:

  1. Close the solution
  2. Manually delete all binaries and downloaded packages
  3. Re-open solution and build
  4. Verify that the build order is:
    1. CSharpNuGetHelper
    2. CppCliDemo
    3. CSharpConsoleTest (my console test demo app)
  5. Run the console app and verify the serialisation works as before

 

 

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C# TimeSpan TypeConverter and UITypeEditor

Code for this post is on GitHub.

I have an application that presents various TimeSpan properties to a user. The default string conversion isn’t great, in fact for anything other than hh:mm:ss it isn’t intuitive.

A TimeSpan of 1 day, 2 minutes, 3 hours, 4 seconds, and 5 milliseconds is shown in the example below:

Dev10.png

After a little noodling I found some articles that helped me put together something better (at least for me!).

The first feature is the presentation of a TimeSpan instance as a string:

dev10

The second feature is the ability to convert back from a string. For example, entering a value of 1h, 5s:

Dev10.png

… becomes…

Dev10.png

And finally, the property can present an interactive editor via a dropdown:

Dev10.png

Here’s an example of how the new classes are used as attributes on a TimeSpan:

[TypeConverter(typeof(TimeSpanStringConverter))]
[Editor(typeof(TimeSpanUIEditor), typeof(UITypeEditor))]
[DefaultValue(typeof(TimeSpan), "1.02:03:04.005")]
[DisplayName("Custom 1")]
public TimeSpan A { get; set; } = new TimeSpan(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

WCF HttpListenerException

A problem I’ve had for a while:

Running an application from Visual Studio 2013 without administrator privileges and trying to start a WCF service results in a HttpListenerException.

My service host’s URI was http://localhost:8000.

W8x64_2014

The problem goes away when Studio is started with Administrator:

W8x64_2014

But that’s a pain for me for a variety of reasons.

I googled and found lots of information on stackoverflow. I tried to use the developer-reserved Design_Time_Addresses solution on port 8732, and then on 8731, but to no avail.

So then I figured how to look for this URL on my PC. From a command shell run:

netsh http show urlacl

Then I spotted the design time addresses URL:

W8x64_2014

Port 8733 !

So I changed my URI to http://localhost:8733/Design_Time_Addresses and everything worked.

This new URI is only for use when running the service in a debugged session via Visual Studio. For normal runtime use I still use the original URI of http://localhost:8000.

Update: I’m now using the following property to get the URI at runtime:

static public string ServerPath
{
    get
    {
        string serverPath = "http://localhost:8000";

        if (System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached == true)
        {
            serverPath = "http://localhost:8733/Design_Time_Addresses";
        }

        return serverPath;
    }
}