TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds rounding!

Today’s fairly brutal gotcha: TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds accepts a double but internally rounds the value to a long before converting to ticks (multiplying by 10000).

For example, using C# interactive in VS2017:

> TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1.5)
[00:00:00.0020000]

> TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1234.5678)
[00:00:01.2350000]

Using .FromTicks works as expected:


> TimeSpan.FromTicks(15000)
[00:00:00.0015000]

To be fair this is the documented behavior:

The value parameter is converted to ticks, and that number of ticks is used to initialize the new TimeSpan. Therefore, value will only be considered accurate to the nearest millisecond.

But really, it isn’t expected since the input is a double!

This all came to light because a camera system I’m involved with started overexposing –  the integration time was programmed as 2ms instead of the desired 1.5ms. Hmmph!

So a little alternative:

> TimeSpan TimeSpanFromMillisecondsEx(double ms) =>
    TimeSpan.FromTicks((long)(ms * 10000.0))

> TimeSpanFromMillisecondsEx(1.5)
[00:00:00.0015000]

 

Note: the FromMilliseconds method delegates to an internal Interval method, passing the milliseconds value and 1 as the scale:


private static TimeSpan Interval(double value, int scale)
{
    if (double.IsNaN(value))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Arg_CannotBeNaN"));
    }
    double num = value * scale;
    double num2 = num + ((value >= 0.0) ? 0.5 : -0.5);
    if ((num2 > 922337203685477) || (num2 = 0.0) ? 0.5 : -0.5);
    if ((num2 > 922337203685477) || (num2 < -922337203685477))
    {
        throw new OverflowException(Environment.GetResourceString("Overflow_TimeSpanTooLong"));
    }
    return new TimeSpan(((long) num2) * 0x2710L);
}

 

 

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